Jitters

Jitters
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Picture Credits: Mazlov

A part wants to break away from the other part. The part that wants to break away claims a different culture. How many cultures make the whole. Who are the true people from the part that wants to break away and the true people from the part that believes in the whole. How many parts make up the whole and how many parts break down the whole. Is the whole more corrupt than its parts. How can you know your part in the parts and which part. There are variations of language. There are variations in weather and this can change the constitution of this or that part of the people. They are burning tyres on the highway. Some people are unfurling flags and waving them in the air as symbol for solidarity. A shift to the right in the south, a slight shift to the left in the centre, and here, further north, it is unclear. How far can we break down the parts before we find the whole again. Everyone at the bus stop is jittery. When will it arrive. What if it keeps going. You have to keep your eye out. You have to stick your thumb out. If you want the bus to keep going, wave your finger and shake your head. If you wave your finger for the bus to stop, you have sent the wrong signal.

marcus slease

About marcus slease

Born in Portadown, Northern Ireland, Marcus Slease has made his home in Turkey, Poland, Italy, South Korea, the United States, Spain, and the United Kingdom – experiences that inform his nomadic surrealist writing. His fiction and poetry have appeared in Tin House, Fence, and Versopolis Review, among others. Currently, he lives in Castelldefels, Spain and teaches high school literature in Barcelona. His latest book is The Green Monk (Boiler House Press).

Born in Portadown, Northern Ireland, Marcus Slease has made his home in Turkey, Poland, Italy, South Korea, the United States, Spain, and the United Kingdom – experiences that inform his nomadic surrealist writing. His fiction and poetry have appeared in Tin House, Fence, and Versopolis Review, among others. Currently, he lives in Castelldefels, Spain and teaches high school literature in Barcelona. His latest book is The Green Monk (Boiler House Press).

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