Litro: Literary Magazine – Stories Transport You

  • Dreaming of Home: <em>Swing Time</em> by Zadie Smith Dreaming of Home: Swing Time by Zadie Smith
  • Every Falling Anecdote Every Falling Anecdote
  • Going Nuclear: <em>The Children</em> at the Royal Court Theatre Going Nuclear: The Children at the Royal Court Theatre
  • Bleak and Brine Bleak and Brine
  • Stories of Flight Stories of Flight
  • Red Red
  • The Fire Lit Within: <em>Abstract Expressionism</em> at the Royal Academy The Fire Lit Within: Abstract Expressionism at the Royal Academy
  • <em>People on Sunday</em> | Everyday Life in the Weimar Before the Nazis Arrived People on Sunday | Everyday Life in the Weimar Before the Nazis Arrived

 

 

     

 #flashfriday

  • Wormwood

    At night, in quiet weather, you can hear them scratching; like that grating sound when mother rubs your knees with sandpaper, because you tried to smoke grandfather’s pipe or mispronounced ‘rough shag’.

#Story Sunday

  • Scouring

    Kath presses the on button. While the handset powers up she slides open the drawer, riffles through brown envelopes, closes it again intact. She feels nauseous. Her phone vibrates making her jump; a pale blue flight flickers in the

 Back Issues

#Essay Saturday

  • Angels on Platform 1

    I've just spent almost an hour inside a railway station without a single substance in my body to alleviate terror. This is a first in ten years, or more.

 #Arts & Culture

#On Writing

  • Stories of Flight

    Refugees and their stories have featured in literature from time immemorial. They are cast in heroic roles in the Bible and the Koran.

Litro Lab

#Tuesday Tales

  • A Cure for Snakebites

    Through the holiday, Tess had become accustomed to expecting Sunni’s attention, but she now found he was dispensing it meanly.

#Lunch Break Fiction

  • Trip to India

    I looked out the taxi window at the pouring rain. Monsoon season was never fun. We always came to India in the winter so as to avoid the scorching summer heat.

Latest Posts

  • Tia Bannon and Mark Rose in Abigail. A Fractured Mosaic: Abigail at the Bunker Theatre (1/17/2017) - The fractured Abigail at the Bunker Theatre is like watching an episode of Art Attack if the TV had turned off halfway through.
  • A Cure for Snakebites (1/17/2017) - Through the holiday, Tess had become accustomed to expecting Sunni’s attention, but she now found he was dispensing it meanly.
  • Scouring (1/15/2017) - Kath presses the on button. While the handset powers up she slides open the drawer, riffles through brown envelopes, closes it again intact. She feels nauseous. Her phone vibrates making Read More
  • Wormwood (1/13/2017) - At night, in quiet weather, you can hear them scratching; like that grating sound when mother rubs your knees with sandpaper, because you tried to smoke grandfather’s pipe or mispronounced Read More
  • Swing Time Dreaming of Home: Swing Time by Zadie Smith (1/12/2017) - Swing Time, an outlier in Zadie Smith's oeuvre, is stylistically interesting, socially aware, funny and wise.
  • Pomegranates (1/10/2017) - Running through the usual gestures of self-reproach, our hero descends into the waking city. Old hand at this kind of thing, sea-legs keep her steady as she regards her reflection Read More
  • A Flash Of Inspiration: ‘El Raval’ by James Brodows (1/9/2017) - Doing a night feed with a milk-drunk baby in my arms. All of my decent ideas are formulated during night feeds, it’s a precious time for silence and space and Read More
  • Every Falling Anecdote (1/8/2017) - They never tell you how much time there is between the second you fall and when you come back up. There were enough seconds for everyone and everything that doesn’t Read More

Fiction

  • Apis

    “I imagine my reflection is another woman, a strange creature who can float next to my window, and keep pace with a speeding train. Some kind of witch. Her expression is blank.”

Interviews

Travel & Lifestyle

  • Bleak and Brine

    “Body, remember not only how deeply you were loved… but also those desires that flashed openly in their eyes.”

Book Reviews

Read More Book Reviews